Tag

Pennsylvania

VP Trish: FORE!

FORE!!! Getting close! The foursomes for the National Golf Tournament have been scheduled and forwarded to Tournament Chair, Greg Wieser. Handicaps were set based on information provided by the golfers and the scores from past tournaments. Thank you, Druhna Mary Whalen, for that information.

Gifts and prizes have been ordered; meals and entertainment are set; courses are ready for us! Nest 610 is prepared!

As I asked in the last blog, please bring a backpack (empty is fine) or non-perishable food items to donate. The Nest is going to donate to local organizations that help children and feed the hungry.

The week of August 2, each golfer will receive an email from me full of information: Nest address, times for buses, meals, entertainment – all that you need to know. If you are registered and do not hear from me, please contact me!

For those of you who have returned your waivers, thank you much! If you haven’t done so yet, please do. A waiver has been emailed to all the golfers; if you need me to mail you one, please let me know.

Enjoy! Keep safe! See you soon!!! Holy, moly, haven’t been able to say that in quite some time!

Czolem!

VP Trish: Not Long Now!

It won’t be long until we see each other in Erie! This is so exciting! Registration is open until tomorrow! Hope you are registered! If not, please do so as soon as is possible!

Hole sponsorships are still available. Please sponsor a hole for you, your family, your Nest, your District, your business, grandkids, whomever! Nest 610 is greatly appreciative of all!

Most of the Districts are represented by golfers. It would be really wonderful if every District and every Nest was a hole sponsor. Please consider supporting Nest 610 and the first National event in two years!

Currently, I am working on handicaps, dues status, foursomes and waivers. If you do not hear from me (by the end of this week), please contact me. My email to each of you is also serving as a confirmation and I want to be sure all applications are received (either through our site or the postal service).

Any questions, please reach out to me!

FORE and Czolem!

VP Trish: Golf Carts

Registration continues for the National Golf Tournament; I received several more yesterday. There are also a few more Nests represented. Not every District has participants. Wouldn’t it be cool if each District had at least one foursome! I guess asking each Nest would be stretching it!! But is it?!!

Nest 610 is well on their way to being prepared for all of us! Tournament Chair, Greg Wieser and I communicate on a regular basis. Please submit your entries and don’t forget about being a hole sponsor!

Tournament chair Greg Wieser and his son recently golfed at a course in Colorado—look at that view!

Last week while on vacation, John and I took Ryan and Ryanna to Adventure Zone (in Geneva on the Lake, Ohio). When we were purchasing their fun package, the woman at the counter informed us that Ryan was tall enough to drive a go kart! Well, Ryan was not interested as he pointed out to me that he did not know how to manipulate the steering wheel or work the gas or brakes. My smart, sensible boy! The next day, we rented a golf cart. We taught both of them how to drive the cart, allowing each of them a few turns. While they still need a bit more practice, maybe next time we go to Adventure Zone, Ryan will be prepared!

Golf carts were originally made to transport women to the grocery store. They were not used on golf courses until the early 1970’s. The original ones were three wheelers in a Vespa style and were gas fueled. During the gas rationing period of WWII, the electric cart was invented. Obviously, golf carts are used for many purposes including transporting folks in communities.

So many carts are used in Arizona that back in 2014, a law was passed that allowed the drivers to drive closely to the right-hand side of the road. Prior to that, there were citations issued because they weren’t driving in the center of the lane.

When I started golfing in the early 90’s, one had a choice of a cart with or without a roof. Being the sun-worshipper I was, we always got one without. Baking in the sun was great for my tan but literally drained us. Now, I don’t even know of a place to rent one without the roof!

Any questions, please contact me vptrish@polishfalcons.org.

Czolem!!

VP Trish: Golf Registrations & Bags

There is still plenty of time to register, but it would be wonderful if you were able to do so soon – just to give Nest 610 an idea of what to expect as well as help me. From previous tournaments and discussion, I know there are others who haven’t registered yet.

As the registrations continue to arrive, I have made a list of the Nests and Districts represented so far:

• Nest 4-South Bend, IN
• Nest 6-Buffalo, NY
• Nest 8-Pittsburgh, PA
• Nest 41-New Kensington, PA
• Nest 45-St. Louis, MO
• Nest 52-Rochester, NY
• Nest 74-Auburn, NY
• Nest 80-South Bend, IN
• Nest 86-Hamtramck, MI
• Nest 123-Erie, PA
• Nest 146-New Castle, PA
• Nest 182-Ambridge, PA
• Nest 307-Southington, CT
• Nest 430-Auburn, NY
• Nest 493-Batavia, NY
• Nest 519-Middletown, CT
• Nest 580-Pittsfield, MA
• Nest 610-Erie, PA

Districts: II, IV, V, VI, IX & XIII

Please don’t forget to send in your hole sponsorship forms as well!


History of Golf Bags

Back at the beginning, if players were carrying different clubs, they would simply tie them together with a piece of cord. The first club carrying golf bag was invented in the early 1900’s. The first bags were about the size and shape of modern Sunday bags. They were made of canvas and had a small 4” opening at the top and were less than 35 inches long.

Throughout the years and with lots of experimentation, the material used to make the bags has changed. Obviously, golfers prefer a lighter-weight bag. It was also determined that there was a need for the bag to have legs.

Along with the growth and popularity of the game of golf, and an increase in the variety of clubs, golfers carried more clubs and needed a larger bag.

There is a limit to the number of clubs that a golfer may carry. The 14-club rule was adopted by the USGA back in 1939. This was one of the determining factors in the size of golf bags.

There were also changes made to accommodate the need for more space to carry balls, gloves and even rule books.

There are many different types of modern golf club bags these days. The bags are larger, but weigh less, are much more durable and even accommodate our modern world with a special pocket for cell phones.

Enjoy this wonderful weather!

VP Trish: Hole Sponsors & Golf Balls

Registration just keeps coming in, haven’t finalized the latest numbers yet but it seems as though we are ready to hit the links.

Nest 610 sent out letters asking Members to support their Nest by sponsoring a hole. The cost is $100.00 per hole and includes a sign and listing on the sponsor board, as well as supporting Nest 610.

Please click here to sponsor a hole. You are able to download the application and send it to Nest 610. I am sure if you don’t have a printer, that a note to them (along with your check) will do the job!


4 Stages in the Evolution of the Golf Ball

Although it is likely that the very first golf balls were nothing more than round rocks or pebbles, there are four distinctly recognizable stages in the evolution of the golf ball…

Wooden Golf Balls

There is no question that the first games of golf, as we know it today, were played using wooden golf balls. Wooden golf balls were the first man-made golf balls, and although information is scant, it would be a pretty safe bet to assume that a wooden golf ball had some rather interesting playing characteristics.

Feathery Golf Balls (Feather-Stuffed, Leather-Covered Golf Balls)

The first “real” golf ball was known as a “feathery” golf ball. Basically, the feathery was a leather sack filled with boiled goose feathers, then stitched up and painted. Feathery golf balls were expensive to make, easily damaged and only the privileged few could afford to use them.

Gutty Golf Balls

It wasn’t until 1848 that Rev. Dr. Robert Adams began creating golf balls out of Gutta Percha “Gutty.” The Gutty golf ball was created from the dried sap of the Sapodilla tree. It had a rubber-like feel and was formed into ball shapes by heating it up and shaping it while hot.

Rubber Core Golf Balls

The advent of the rubber core golf ball changed the face of the game of golf as we knew it. This new design was invented in 1898 by Coburn Haskell in association with the BF Goodrich Company. This new and unique golf ball construction and design featured a solid rubber core, high tension rubber thread wrapped around the core, and a Gutta Percha cover.

Continued Evolution of Golf Ball Design

Today, two-piece solid Syrilin covered balls are more popular with amateur golfers, as they tend to be more durable. Syrilin golf balls are longer and straighter as well. Many pros however, are still devoted to the soft and lively Balata balls, since they can get the distance needed and prefer the added spin for control.

Golf Ball Design and the USGA

The business of golf balls is not open-ended; the characteristics of golf balls are strictly governed by rules. These rules determine such things as:

  • Golf ball weight
  • Golf ball size
  • Maximum initial velocity
  • Spherical integrity and symmetry
  • Combined carry and roll of the ball

These and other characteristics make up the framework that today’s golf ball manufacturers work within as they vie technologically against each other.

The expression “a golf ball is a golf ball is a golf ball,” simply does not apply. What appears to be just a small round object is in fact the product of many current leading-edge technologies.

Any questions about golf, please reach out to me.

Czolem!

VP Trish: History of Golf Clubs (and Tournament Update!)

As of this morning, there are close to 50 golfers registered for our upcoming event. This is exciting! I appreciate the honesty of those registering regarding their league handicap or their typical golf score. This will make the tournament fair as well as tons of fun!

Erie is perfect! This is the fourth time for Nest 610 to host, and the 18th time for a District IX Nest.

Scenic Heights Golf Course is a family-owned business by the Afton’s that was built on farmland and opened in 1995 as a nine-hole course. It expanded to a full par 72 challenging 18 holes in the early 2000’s and is well known for its beautiful scenery (especially the fall foliage), living up to its name “Scenic Heights.” The course is currently home to 15 weekday leagues and over 35 fundraising outings during the snow melt to snowfall season (usually from April into November). The 100-seat picnic pavilion was added in 2018 to accommodate the ever growing number of outings.

The other course being used is Downing Golf Course. More about that one next time!

If you have any questions, please let me know!


History of Golf Clubs

In the pastime played by the Scottish that later became the game of golf, small pebbles were hit around the sand dunes using wooden sticks.

Early Clubs

For hundreds of years, golf clubs were made out of wood, and it was not until late last century that the wooden shaft was replaced by other materials. Players initially carved their own clubs and balls from wood, though they soon turned to skilled craftsmen to produce competitive equipment.

Club Names

Using numbers to signify the different clubs is a relatively new thing. For a long time different clubs were known by a variety of names, such as:

  • Longnoses – for driving
  • Bulgers – like today’s woods as they have a bulbous head.
  • Fairway clubs (or grassed drivers) – for medium range shots
  • Spoons – for short range shots
  • Niblicks – like a wedge
  • Cleek – for putting

Woods

The shafts of the early clubs were made out of local European woods like ash or hazel. Club heads were made from tough wood such as beech, holly, pear and apple. The heads of the wooden clubs were long and thin, resulting in them being known as “long-nose woods.” Wooden-headed clubs were usually hand made by the local golf professionals until the early 1900s, when the growth in popularity of the game made factory produced clubs profitable.

Irons

Even as metal clubs became available, they were used sparingly as they could easily damage the early ‘feathery’ golf balls. As early as 1750 some club-makers used forged metal heads for niblicks (wedges). A metal-headed club may have just been saved for getting the ball out of the rough or from cart tracks. The early iron clubs, made by blacksmiths until about the 1870s, were quite crudely made, making them heavy to wield and difficult to control. The advent of drop forging technique in the late 1800s resulted in lighter and better made clubs that could be mass produced in factories.

The early 1900s was a period of experimental golf club designs, with many not proving the test of time. One of the most important changes was the move in around 1908 from smooth faces on the irons to the grooves that are used today. The grooves enabled more backspin on a ball, resulting in more distance.

Shafts

The shafts of the early clubs were made out of local European woods like Ash. The introduction of golf into America in the early 1800s lead to hickory wood being used in the shafts, which was found to be far more durable than other woods. Hickory became the standard material for golf club shafts until steel shafts were introduced in about 1925 in the US, and became standard everywhere from the mid-1930s. They had the advantage as they did not break like the hickory shafts and could be produced reliably with uniform feel in matched sets. The graphite shaft, which is lighter and stronger than steel, was introduced in 1973.

Today

Today’s sets of woods and irons are developed using computer technology to provide durability, weight distribution, hitting distance and accuracy. They are also made using advanced materials such as titanium, graphite and zirconia.

Czolem!

VP Trish: National Golf Registration

Committees are set, volunteers have been recruited, hotels are confirmed, golf courses are booked, menus have been created, entertainment scheduled…all of this in preparation for the upcoming National Golf Tournament (along with a few more surprises!).

The event is the 52nd National Golf Tournament and the fourth time that Nest 610, Erie, Pa. is the host. All that is missing is YOU! The registration opens today, so please click here and sign up. If you register prior to June 15, I will hand you a crisp ten-dollar bill when I see you at the sign in table in August!

Come to Erie for a few days of golf and camaraderie! Cost per golfer is $160.00 which includes two rounds of golf (with a cart), two lunches, two dinners and prizes.


Everything has its’ own lingo (most things!) so I thought we could have some fun!

Golf Lingo:

  • Afraid of the Dark: When the putted ball refuses to fall into the hole.
  • Cabbage (or spinach): When you hit the ball into inescapable thick rough.
  • Chili Dip: Hitting the ground behind the ball before impact with the ball.
  • Dawn Patrol: Golfers who play at sunrise.
  • Foot Wedge: When a player uses their foot to push the ball into a better position.
  • Lumberjack: When a golfer hits a ball into a wooded area numerous times during a round and continues to hit the trees trying to get out of the woods.

Looking forward to seeing all of you! Any questions, please contact me vptrish@polishfalcons.org.

Czolem!

Past National Bowling Tournaments

We are missing our bowlers this year! As we await the time we can gather together once again, check out this list of past PFA National Bowling Tournaments compiled by Janet Knauber and Trish Del Busse.