Tag

fraternalism

Virtual 1-Mile Walk for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Polish Falcons of America is sponsoring a Virtual 1-Mile Walk for Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October. We are asking for at least a $10 donation at registration. All registration donations will be sent to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc. Get your group together, get out, and walk for a cause! Wear pink and support Breast Cancer Awareness. Remember: With HOPE all things are possible! We can help to find the cure. Click here for additional details and registration.

VP Trish: “It’s Christmas!”

My Mom used to say that when preparing for Christmas, one would shop, wrap, bake, cook and decorate until you simply ran out of time! It’s Christmas! Years ago when working on events, we would say to one another – it’s Christmas! The event is here; there is no more time.

Today at Nest 610 in Erie, Pa., it’s Christmas! Some golfers have already arrived and are golfing in the Hammer Open. Others are traveling. Registration opens at 4 p.m., and it is going to be so wonderful to be at a National Event (it has been too long)!

Hopefully, Mother Nature will smile on us!

Looking forward to fun, fraternalism and camaraderie! Thank you to Greg Wieser and all the Nest 610 Members who have worked so hard in preparation of this wonderful event!

Czolem!

VP Trish: Golf Carts

Registration continues for the National Golf Tournament; I received several more yesterday. There are also a few more Nests represented. Not every District has participants. Wouldn’t it be cool if each District had at least one foursome! I guess asking each Nest would be stretching it!! But is it?!!

Nest 610 is well on their way to being prepared for all of us! Tournament Chair, Greg Wieser and I communicate on a regular basis. Please submit your entries and don’t forget about being a hole sponsor!

Tournament chair Greg Wieser and his son recently golfed at a course in Colorado—look at that view!

Last week while on vacation, John and I took Ryan and Ryanna to Adventure Zone (in Geneva on the Lake, Ohio). When we were purchasing their fun package, the woman at the counter informed us that Ryan was tall enough to drive a go kart! Well, Ryan was not interested as he pointed out to me that he did not know how to manipulate the steering wheel or work the gas or brakes. My smart, sensible boy! The next day, we rented a golf cart. We taught both of them how to drive the cart, allowing each of them a few turns. While they still need a bit more practice, maybe next time we go to Adventure Zone, Ryan will be prepared!

Golf carts were originally made to transport women to the grocery store. They were not used on golf courses until the early 1970’s. The original ones were three wheelers in a Vespa style and were gas fueled. During the gas rationing period of WWII, the electric cart was invented. Obviously, golf carts are used for many purposes including transporting folks in communities.

So many carts are used in Arizona that back in 2014, a law was passed that allowed the drivers to drive closely to the right-hand side of the road. Prior to that, there were citations issued because they weren’t driving in the center of the lane.

When I started golfing in the early 90’s, one had a choice of a cart with or without a roof. Being the sun-worshipper I was, we always got one without. Baking in the sun was great for my tan but literally drained us. Now, I don’t even know of a place to rent one without the roof!

Any questions, please contact me vptrish@polishfalcons.org.

Czolem!!

VP Trish: History of Golf Clubs (and Tournament Update!)

As of this morning, there are close to 50 golfers registered for our upcoming event. This is exciting! I appreciate the honesty of those registering regarding their league handicap or their typical golf score. This will make the tournament fair as well as tons of fun!

Erie is perfect! This is the fourth time for Nest 610 to host, and the 18th time for a District IX Nest.

Scenic Heights Golf Course is a family-owned business by the Afton’s that was built on farmland and opened in 1995 as a nine-hole course. It expanded to a full par 72 challenging 18 holes in the early 2000’s and is well known for its beautiful scenery (especially the fall foliage), living up to its name “Scenic Heights.” The course is currently home to 15 weekday leagues and over 35 fundraising outings during the snow melt to snowfall season (usually from April into November). The 100-seat picnic pavilion was added in 2018 to accommodate the ever growing number of outings.

The other course being used is Downing Golf Course. More about that one next time!

If you have any questions, please let me know!


History of Golf Clubs

In the pastime played by the Scottish that later became the game of golf, small pebbles were hit around the sand dunes using wooden sticks.

Early Clubs

For hundreds of years, golf clubs were made out of wood, and it was not until late last century that the wooden shaft was replaced by other materials. Players initially carved their own clubs and balls from wood, though they soon turned to skilled craftsmen to produce competitive equipment.

Club Names

Using numbers to signify the different clubs is a relatively new thing. For a long time different clubs were known by a variety of names, such as:

  • Longnoses – for driving
  • Bulgers – like today’s woods as they have a bulbous head.
  • Fairway clubs (or grassed drivers) – for medium range shots
  • Spoons – for short range shots
  • Niblicks – like a wedge
  • Cleek – for putting

Woods

The shafts of the early clubs were made out of local European woods like ash or hazel. Club heads were made from tough wood such as beech, holly, pear and apple. The heads of the wooden clubs were long and thin, resulting in them being known as “long-nose woods.” Wooden-headed clubs were usually hand made by the local golf professionals until the early 1900s, when the growth in popularity of the game made factory produced clubs profitable.

Irons

Even as metal clubs became available, they were used sparingly as they could easily damage the early ‘feathery’ golf balls. As early as 1750 some club-makers used forged metal heads for niblicks (wedges). A metal-headed club may have just been saved for getting the ball out of the rough or from cart tracks. The early iron clubs, made by blacksmiths until about the 1870s, were quite crudely made, making them heavy to wield and difficult to control. The advent of drop forging technique in the late 1800s resulted in lighter and better made clubs that could be mass produced in factories.

The early 1900s was a period of experimental golf club designs, with many not proving the test of time. One of the most important changes was the move in around 1908 from smooth faces on the irons to the grooves that are used today. The grooves enabled more backspin on a ball, resulting in more distance.

Shafts

The shafts of the early clubs were made out of local European woods like Ash. The introduction of golf into America in the early 1800s lead to hickory wood being used in the shafts, which was found to be far more durable than other woods. Hickory became the standard material for golf club shafts until steel shafts were introduced in about 1925 in the US, and became standard everywhere from the mid-1930s. They had the advantage as they did not break like the hickory shafts and could be produced reliably with uniform feel in matched sets. The graphite shaft, which is lighter and stronger than steel, was introduced in 1973.

Today

Today’s sets of woods and irons are developed using computer technology to provide durability, weight distribution, hitting distance and accuracy. They are also made using advanced materials such as titanium, graphite and zirconia.

Czolem!

VP Trish: National Golf Rules

If all continues to go well, the National Golf Tournament should be enjoyed as scheduled! Nest 610, Erie, Pa., is prepared to welcome the golfers for the event on August 12 & 13. Of course, the Hammer is played the day prior to the Tournament.

I will be sending an email to the golfers asking about their planned participation in this year’s Tournament. Please respond and share with others who might be interested!

The Golf Commissioners met via Zoom on March 8 and revised the National Golf Tournament rules. The rules were approved by the National Board of Directors at the Board of Directors meeting held on March 13, 2021.


National Golf Tournament

Participants:

  • Must be a Member in Good Standing by the beginning of the Tournament

Format:

  • Two Person Scrambles one day
  • Individual Tournament one day

National Golf Commissioner Responsibilities:

  • Application – Oversee creation and/or modification for all information pertaining to the Tournament
  • Work with Communications Director for publication and posting of all information related to the Tournament
  • Communicate with all golfers with details prior to the event, confirming their registration and handicap
  • Waivers – All participants must complete and sign a waiver form to participate in the Tournament. The Commissioner shall oversee the preparation, distribution and collection of the waivers.
  • Assign the Foursomes
  • Scoring – Tabulate the results for both events
  • Posting of pairings of starting holes and foursomes for both days

The host Nest/District and the National Golf Commissioner shall work together to:

  • Establish the entry fee for golf and all functions
  • Establish the Prizes for the Tournament
  • Assemble and distribute a Welcome Packet to all golfers

Host Nest/District will:

  • Post $500 deposit to secure the event (this will be refunded upon successful completion of the Tournament)
  • Select and secure either one or two courses
  • Make hotel arrangements in the area taking cost, amenities and location into consideration
  • Arrange for entertainment at their facility in the evenings
  • Provide meals (lunch on the courses and dinner both evenings) for all golfers and guests
  • For evening functions, provide transportation to the hotel and venue and back both nights

Date:

  • Second Friday and Saturday of August, if possible, if not Second Thursday and Friday of August

Scoring:

  • PFA will accept a League handicap or Ghin card.
  • If a golfer doesn’t have a League handicap or Ghin card, PFA will use a Falcons’ handicap (this is determined by the average of scores from three previous PFA National Tournaments).
  • The handicap for new golfers without League handicap, Ghin card, or Falcons’ handicap shall be women-30, men-20.
  • Double par-pick up (once you reach, double par, you pick up your ball and take that score.)

Divisions:

One prize per division

  • Women (up to age 59) Scratch
  • Women (up to age 59) Handicap
  • Senior Women (age 60 and above) Scratch
  • Senior Women (age 60 and above) Handicap
  • Men (up to age 59) Scratch
  • Men (up to age 59) Handicap
  • Senior Men (age 60 and above) Scratch
  • Senior Men (age 60 and above) Handicap
  • May add a Junior Division if there are participants

If interested in hosting the event, the Nest/District should contact the National Golf Commissioner prior to the current year tournament. If there is more than one bid, all golfers will vote on the next host.


All of the District Golf Commissioners joined the Zoom call to revise these rules and I greatly appreciate their participation, suggestions and input.

The District Golf Commissioners are:

  • District I – Edward Ciesla
  • District II – Patricia Heineman & Jeffrey Beilfuss
  • District IV – Stephen Lubinski & Patricia Del Busse
  • District V – James Cox
  • District VI – Robert Kuzmicz
  • District VII – none (as of right now)
  • District IX – Kristen Baginski & Nicholas Carter
  • District XIII – Charles Johns

If you have any questions, please contact me or your District Commissioner.

See you in August!

Czolem!

VP Trish: 2020 Convention

As I sit here finishing up my four-year report, I think of our upcoming Virtual Convention. The reality of this is, is that we don’t have a choice. The PA Insurance Department insisted that we have a Convention and take care of the business that must be handled this year.

There are a couple advantages to a Virtual Convention. Well, maybe one – no travel!

The camaraderie will have to wait until next year. The social gatherings, the Falconette Luncheon, the Legion of Honor Conclave and meeting, hospitality rooms, interactions, auctions, sight-seeing and fun! There is no doubt that Members of Nest 88, New Britain, Conn. will be fabulous hosts.

One of the things that I am disappointed in is that I do not get to present my PowerPoint and explain what I have been doing the last four years as your National First Vice President. I like to put up photos, explain who, what and where and I also like to acknowledge Members. Included in this blog are a few photos of events from the past couple of years; obviously, I am not able to explain everything.

I am hoping that all of our Delegates take the time to read our reports ahead of time. Each Delegate will receive a binder prior to the Convention which will contain reports and other information needed for the Convention.

Hopefully, all of the Nests have elected their Delegates. The deadline for National Headquarters to receive the mandate forms is October 20. Please visit polishfalcons.org/national-convention. The form is fillable, fill it out, save it, then attach it as an email and send to convention2020@polishfalcons.org. Again, deadline is October 20. Once we receive your forms, we need to verify membership and dues.

Looking forward to our Convention on Saturday, November 21.

Fraternal Information

In order for an organization to be considered a fraternal, the organization must have a lodge system. This is why the Polish Falcons of America has Nests and why each Member must belong to a Nest. The Polish Falcons of America is a 501 (C) 8 non-profit.

Fraternals were formed with a common cause in mind; the PFA is obviously ethnic-based. We do now permit those who are not Polish but have a genuine interest in the Polish culture and traditions.

Keep safe! Wash those hands!

Czolem!

Druhna Chris: PFA Beginnings

With the outbreak of COVID-19 and the cancellation of PFA events, and with history being an important part of the Falcons, I would like you to share your experiences as a Member with us. I am interested in how you became a Member; was it through your parents or grandparents? What activities have you been involved in, or are still involved in today? What is your favorite memory? How have your friendships in the PFA flourished? What are some of the things that you have learned as a Member? These are all things that interest me.

I know that I became involved in the PFA through my Ciocia, Betty Bubacz. She was the Instructress for Nest 118 in Pittsburgh. She always stopped at our house on the way to gym class with my cousins. One summer evening, she saw how bored I was and decided I should go with them to gym class. So, I went. That night Druhna Leona Kozloski was there to teach Polish dancing. I had so much fun that I continued to go to gym class and have been active pretty much since then. I did have a bit of a break during college. I got involved again when our National First Vice President Trish talked me into attending a Nest meeting. She has been one of those lifelong friends who helps me with everything. As soon as my children were able to attend events, they became actively involved. They both, too, have made many lifelong friends in the PFA. My husband took a little longer to get involved, but has been my back-up and behind the scenes helper with everything I do in my job as the National Physical Education Director. My cousin Barbara Chervenak was, for a while, my helper at all the Youth Events as Secretary, and a general helper with everything. Now, my cousin Patty Capozoli helps me with all those events. We always manage to have a great time with each other and the youth participants. After my pause for college, I have been active in my Nest and District and with the National Office. The Puskar’s are a Polish Falcons family. All of my closest friends are Polish Falcons people. I am very grateful to my Ciocia Betty for taking me with her to gym class that day. Polish Falcons is a huge part of my life, and I love every minute of it.

Now it’s your turn. I would love to hear the stories of how you became involved in the PFA. I know that there are many, many families that have similar stories to tell. Now that we are all mostly at home practicing our “social distancing,” you might have the time to write down your story and send it to me. Maybe we will get enough stories together to put them into a book. I love photos too. Maybe you can send one or two with your story?

There is no age limit to who can send their stories. All ages can tell us about their favorite parts of the PFA. I am looking forward to hearing from you! Email your story to cpuskar@polishfalcons.org.

Czolem!

#GivingTuesdayNow: Support your Nest!

05/12/2020 Update: Contributions now being accepted through May 31, 2020.

Support your Nest!

#GivingTuesdayNow (May 5) is a global day of generosity and unity, a day to come together and give back in response to the unprecedented need caused by COVID-19, no matter who or where we are.

If able in this difficult time, PFA National Headquarters is asking Polish Falcons Members to make a contribution to support their Nests.

Our Nests have been closed for five weeks or longer. There is little or no income and bills still need to be paid. How much would you have spent at your Nest over the course of five weeks? Are you able to donate that amount or a portion of it?

Today through May 12, let us come together as Falcons for our Nests. This is your chance to show support for your Nest and make a donation to help the Nest get through these challenging times. No amount is too small. Thank you for giving.

Click here to make your contribution.

VP Trish: Gorecki Scholarship Program

As I write this, the Independent Committee is reviewing this year’s applications for the Richard C. Gorecki Scholarship Program. I wish I could figure out why more of our Members don’t apply for this program. If one receives the grant, it is a $10,000.00 grant. Yes, $10,000.00!

Richard C. Gorecki passed away on April 14, 1994 and generously bequeathed a portion of his estate to the Polish Falcons for educational purposes. The Gorecki Scholarships are designed to reward those Falcon Members who demonstrate the highest academic standards and leadership qualities. Since Druh was from Nest 79, a Nest 79 Member receives an additional $1,000.00. Or if a Member is from another District XIII Nest, they receive an additional $500.00. (The additional amount is only $1000.00, not $1500.00 if you belong to Nest 79.)

I agree this application takes a bit more work than our Dr. T.A. Starzynski Scholarship. There are a few more qualifications but not difficult ones.

  • A Member has to have been a Member at least six years.
  • This Member must have a permanent plan of insurance or an annuity. If there is a T or J in your policy number, you do not have a permanent plan. This permanent plan must be in place at least one year prior to application.
  • The applicant (Member) must be entering at least their junior year of college. Full time post graduate students may apply.
  • The applicant must have a G.P.A. of at least 3.0.
  • The Applicant must be enrolled full time and still be enrolled full time when collecting the grant.
  • National Dues must be current; billing of National Dues begins at age 18.

The application itself is rather simple.

  • There are two essay questions, each with a minimum of 500 words.
  • Falcon activity and/or community service are very important. One community service form and letter are required.
  • Nest information form and letter are requested, but if one is not very active in Falcons (due to geography or lack of programs in your area), as long as there is community service, one would qualify. Keep in mind that even though your area may not be very active, there are National Youth Programs.
  • Three letters of recommendation are required. Recommendations may not be from relatives, the Nest or Community Service Organization as requested above. I personally enjoy writing letters of recommendation; I am sure there are others who feel the same way!
  • College or university transcripts sent by the institution.
  • The deadline is always April 15; paperwork must be postmarked by this date.

As I mentioned, the decision as to whom receives a grant is made by an Independent Committee; no one is a Falcon Member. There are five individuals who meet and decide. When I receive the applications, I confirm Membership and qualifications. Copies are then made and mailed to each Committee Member. Following, the Committee comes to our office and we all have dinner. I, then leave the room while the Committee meets and makes their recommendations. I am not part of the process. Obviously, we will not be having dinner this year! The committee will meet virtually.

Another thing that surprises me is that traditionally most of the applicants are female. But this year, there is only one female applicant (very rare).

I understand that college students are extremely busy, but students are used to writing essays so our two essays (we have two questions) don’t take a ton of time; obviously the applicant needs to do some thinking! There is the need to print out forms and request letters from others, but again, not that big of a deal!

So say this entire process takes you eight hours, do you usually earn $1,250.00 an hour? Seriously, invest in yourself and give yourself every opportunity. If you have any questions (any!) regarding our scholarship programs, please contact me at vptrish@polishfalcons.org.

A list of all the Gorecki recipients is on our Scholarships page.

If you are going to be eligible next year, please apply!

Keep safe and healthy! Czolem!

This blog is 676 words, done quickly!